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Author Topic: Why did you leave WCCC?  (Read 6546 times)
liberated
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« on: February 29, 2012, 10:40:28 pm »

As someone who is in the process of leaving Walnut Creek, I was wondering if anyone else would be willing to share their stories and any difficulties they encountered. A lot of my "friends" want very little to do with me and I sometimes wonder if I'm doing something wrong. I would really appreciate hearing other peoples' stories and any advise you may have for me.
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AgathaL'Orange
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« Reply #1 on: March 02, 2012, 09:06:01 am »

The biggest change for me is that I had to relearn how to make friends with people outside the church.  Being in the church for 8 years kind of stunted me in the way of real relationships I think.  Not everyone probably feels that way.  I'm over it now, and have lots of friends outside my current church, but in the beginning that was a challenge.  It was like I suddenly opened my eyes and saw my community and neighborhood in a completely different way.  It was actually so much fun to visit churches and meet people and have freedom.  Around that time we traveled to Europe and had so much fun visiting churches there.  I remember the thrill in my heart to realize that I was part of a gigantic body of faith that had been practiced for 2000 years!  The quietness of the French cloister, the aged catacombs, the majestic Chartres Cathedral, the Vatican, the tiny little African American Baptist church in America, photos of every church I could get my hands on... it was all so healing to me.  In fact, I think I need to do another "healing church journey".  Smiley
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Glad to be free.
Linda
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« Reply #2 on: March 02, 2012, 10:42:45 am »

I agree, Agatha. I am especially sensitive to the friends issue.

I entered my GC church when I was 40. I had established, long term friendships with many people. So, for me, leaving my church when I realized their teaching was flawed was difficult mostly because I am a people person and don't give up on people just because I disagree with them in matters of religion or politics. I left GC after 10 years of heavy involvement with perhaps one lifelong friend. All the others have disappeared.

I still think it is disturbingly dysfunctional that no one ever asked me why we left until many years after our departure when one person asked (she told me they had been told not to ask us why we left). Some of these people I see on a regular basis and no one ever asked why. It's still very odd.

I do view my 10 year membership in a GC church as the biggest parenting mistake I made. I had no idea of the repercussions on what I thought would be life long friendships for my children. The commitment to the church, the movement, the group, the "us" mentality is worse than a high school clique. At least with high school cliques, you eventually graduate and move on. What I thought were solid Christian friendships proved to be conditional and shallow. It's very disheartening.

The pride of being part of such a "special" group of Christians is being taught and passed on to the next generation.

I am sorry, liberated, that you are experiencing this on a personal level. Outside of GC there are many wonderful churches where you will be able to make lifelong Christian friends and enjoy lifelong fellowship no matter what 501c3 tax exempt church you attend.

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Thanks be unto God for his unspeakable gift.
OSU Solid Rock
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« Reply #3 on: October 30, 2012, 02:56:41 pm »

The good thing for me was that I had great friends outside the church.  There was conflict between two lifestyles, and I did not want to quit college or relocate like others were willing to do.  If you leave the church be prepared for those close bonds within the church to effectively shun you.  If the church is your entire lifestyle you may want to develop some friendships through work, neighbors, other groups, (contact your family too), before making that break.  Once you are out you will look back on some of the actions, and church ways and see them for what they really are.  

I will give you a quick example:  I was christened as a child and then baptised as a teenager.  For over a year I was told that I really needed to be baptized again by my discipler @ OSU Bible Studies.  I resisted and said that I had been saved at an earlier time in my life and that I knew my eternity.  Finally I was convinced to go through the process again because it was really important for the spiritual growth of my discipler.  I was to be a notch on his belt so to speak.  When they relocated I never talked to that guy again.
« Last Edit: November 20, 2012, 08:45:33 am by OSU Solid Rock » Logged
gitioan
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« Reply #4 on: November 04, 2012, 10:31:25 pm »

Some time we have to adjust according to situation . We just need some time to judge our surrounding and take decision accordingly .
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josongreay
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« Reply #5 on: March 25, 2013, 09:23:09 pm »

I don't think that you are doing something wrong .
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